Mars Barred

Please join me each week for experiences, observations, and thoughts related to the upcoming project launch (March 2019). Your likes, comments, and shares are very much appreciated. Thanks for taking the time to stop by! Nigel

When I was much younger, years before ‘The Big Bang Theory’ existed (the show, not the theory), I was what you might call a ‘science geek’.

One of my particular interests was our Solar System. I knew it inside out. I’m not referring merely to the basics, like being able to name all the planets. I’m talking about all sorts of facts and trivia. To this day, they are still locked tight in my long-term memory. For example:

  • It takes about 8.3 minutes for light to travel from the Sun to the Earth. In other words, when we see the sun set below the horizon, it actually happened over 8 minutes earlier (a form of ‘time travel’, if you think about it!).
  • A day on Venus is longer than a Venutian year. That’s right…it takes longer for the planet to spin once on its own axis than it does to orbit the sun. Keep that in mind the next time you think YOU have had a long day!
  • Contrary to popular opinion, Saturn isn’t the only planet in our system with rings; it just has the best designer and publicist. And I’m referring to ‘naturally-occurring’ rings, not the human-made ring of junk we currently have orbiting around us.

Which brings me to the Mars Insight Probe.

As you’re likely aware, the Insight Probe landed on Mars yesterday. Having been in the Project Management business for the past 20 years, and leading many different types of projects and teams, I can appreciate what an incredible accomplishment it is to successfully land a device on another planet. Thousands of people, millions of people-hours, and billions of dollars…all focused on a single goal. It is truly remarkable what an excellent team is able to achieve.

And yet…

As interested as I am in science and discovery, and as vested as I am in Project Management, I also recognize that there is a hidden cost to focusing on Outer Space vs. Inner Space.

When I look around on THIS planet, at all the issues we currently face, and consider that we have chosen to direct so much of our attention outward…it makes me question whether our species’ capability has outpaced our maturity, and whether or not that maturity will be able to catch up.

There is an arrogance in our approach; reaching out to other planets while our own habitat quite literally burns…while countless people suffer and die, every hour of every day.

I can’t help but feel we should be getting our own house in order, before seriously contemplating such lofty goals as landing on Mars (even if might involve saving Matt Damon). This is the true evolution of humanity…not simply the gradual and ongoing physical and intellectual advances, but a greater and more meaningful application of those advances.

Some argue that we can do both. To which I respond, “We can do anything, but we can’t do everything.” There is a limited amount of resources available, so prioritization is key. Imagine if years ago, we decided to forego the Insight Probe, and instead spent all that time and effort on improving Quality of Life on Planet Earth? Where could we have been right now?

Quality of Life.

Emerston’s new visionary project makes Quality of Life a priority. Quality of Life for individuals, groups, and for our entire species.

Humanity desperately needs to come together to intentionally decide what’s important, and then act…rather than the way we’ve done things so far, which is essentially the other way around.

2 thoughts on “Mars Barred

  1. We need self sustaining, self replicating Space Stations and to have a solid presence of many such habitats in orbit around Mars before putting humans on the Martian Landscape.

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    1. You’re right, were Mars colonization to proceed, a massive infrastructure would need to be set up in advance. Even more precious resources that could perhaps be used in many different and more effective and efficient ways.

      Like

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